Previous Symposiums

The schedule for the Research Education Symposium 2012 is below:

March 23, 2012

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Poster Competition

Judging by prominent U-M faculty.

The 2012 Abstract book can be found below:

In atrium of the University of Michigan Biomedical Sciences Research Building (BSRB)

10 a.m. to Noon

Symposium

Featuring speeches by:

Steven J. Bernstein, MD, MPH, “Integrating your medical home into your research: Challenges and opportunities”
Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine
Research Scientist, Department of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health
Director, Quality Management Program, University of Michigan Health System

Charles F. Burant, MD, PhD, “Why We Regain Weight: Embedding Research into Subspecialty Care in the Investigational Weight Management Clinic”
Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Professor of Metabolism
Department of Internal Medicine, Metabolism, Endocrinology & Diabetes Division
Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health

Keynote speaker:

Dr. Joe G.N. “Skip” Garcia, MD, “Addressing Health Disparities at an Academic Medical Center in Chicago”
Vice President for Health Affairs, University of Illinois
Earl M. Bane Professor of Medicine, Pharmacology, and Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago

Noon to 12:30 p.m.

Symposium Awards Ceremony

Announcement of the Poster Winners and the 2012 MICHR Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award recipients

 

The highlight of the symposium will be a series of talks on topics with implications for translational and clinical research.  The 2012 symposium speakers were:

Keynote Speaker: 

Dr. Joe G.N. "Skip" Garcia

Dr. Joe G.N. “Skip” Garcia

Dr. Joe G. N. “Skip” Garcia, MD
Vice President for Health Affairs, University of Illinois
Earl M. Bane Professor of Medicine, Pharmacology, and Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago

Dr. Garcia’s topic will be: Addressing Health Disparities at an Academic Medical Center in Chicago

Joe G. N. “Skip” Garcia, M.D., is the Vice President for Health Affairs for the University of Illinois and Earl M. Bane Professor of Medicine, Pharmacology and Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). His prior leadership positions include Vice Chancellor for Research at UIC (2010-2012), Director of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University (1998-2005), and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago (2005-2009).  As the Vice President for Health Affairs, Dr. Garcia oversees a $700 million health science and clinical enterprise; provides oversight of the University of Illinois Medical Center; and connects the clinical mission of the hospital to the research and teaching missions of the University.

Dr. Garcia is an accomplished physician scientist with nearly 400 peer-reviewed publications and an expansive research portfolio of NIH sponsored research.  He is internationally recognized for his expertise on the genetic basis of lung disease and the prevention and treatment of inflammatory lung injury.  His research focuses on understanding the biochemical and molecular basis of lung inflammation, especially vascular leak in which blood cells and fluid escape from the small vessels, causing edema in the surrounding tissues.  Dr. Garcia’s studies of the basic biology of this process have led to new ways to prevent vascular leak, reduce swelling, inhibit tissue damage and restore the integrity of vessel walls.  Several of these approaches have been patented.

Dr. Garcia is a passionate advocate for the training of physician scientists and is an active supporter of minority medical and science students.  He has nurtured many minority students at UIC, Johns Hopkins and the University of Chicago, guiding them into M.D. and Ph.D. programs.

Prominent U-M faculty speakers include:

Steven J. Bernstein, MD, MPHSteven J. Bernstein, MD, MPH
Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine
Research Scientist, Department of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health
Director, Quality Management Program, University of Michigan Health System

Dr. Bernstein’s topic will be: Integrating your medical home into your research: Challenges and opportunities

Dr. Bernstein is Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, and Research Scientist, Department of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He is also an attending physician at the Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center and a Research Scientist at the VA Center for Clinical Management Research and provides support for the VA’s Quality Enhancement Research Initiative for Diabetes.

After earning his medical degree from the University of Rochester (Rochester, New York) in 1984, he completed his internal medicine residency at the University of Pittsburgh.  He continued his training at the University of California, Los Angeles and the RAND Corporation as a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar Fellow and received his master of public health degree. Dr. Bernstein spent one year on sabbatical as a Visiting Professor in Health Services Research at Carlos III Health Institute in Madrid, Spain, where he investigated the appropriateness of use of cardiovascular procedures in Europe.

For the past decade, Dr. Bernstein has focused his effort on improving the quality of care received by University of Michigan Health System (UMHS) patients where he is the Director of the Quality Management Program. This unit is responsible for measuring and improving institutional compliance with out-patient quality standards and developing chronic disease registries.  He also directs the UMHS participation in the Physician Group Incentive Program sponsored by BCBS of Michigan; Quality Improvement efforts related to the CMS Pioneer ACO program and chairs the MiChart Population Management Workgroup.  At the State level, Dr. Bernstein is the Chair of the Michigan Medicaid Drug Utilization Review Board and helping to develop a hospital medicine safety program in 36 Michigan Hospitals.  Nationally, he serves on the International Advisory Committee of the American Society of Clinical Pathology.

 

Dr. Charles F. Burant

Dr. Charles F. Burant

Charles F. Burant, MD, PhD
Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Professor of Metabolism
Department of Internal Medicine, Metabolism, Endocrinology & Diabetes Division
Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health

Dr. Burant’s topic will be: Why We Regain Weight: Embedding Research into Subspecialty Care in the Investigational Weight Management Clinic

Charles Burant, MD, PhD is a Professor of Internal Medicine, and the Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Professor of Metabolism.  Dr. Burant is also Director of the NIH sponsored Michigan Metabolomics and Obesity Center which provides training and infrastructure for basic, clinical and translational research in metabolic diseases.  Dr. Burant also directs MICH-R’s Post-Doctoral Translational Scholars Program, a multidisciplinary career development program designed to prepare individuals with a PhD in a biomedical scientific or social science discipline for independent careers in translational research.

Dr. Burant’s personal research program centers on the interaction between genetics and environmental factors in the development of insulin resistance, obesity and diabetes.  His laboratory is taking advantage of recent technological advances which have made biological, chemical, behavioral and imaging tools readily available to study an individual’s response to environmental factors, such as nutrition.  In collaboration with Drs. Amy Rothberg and Andrew Kraftson and their team in the Investigational Weight Management Clinic, efforts are under way to understanding the metabolic adaptations to weight loss and why despite profound improvements in health, weigh loss almost invariably results in weight regain.  By collecting large amounts of data from people in the clinical setting and using computational tools to integrate and analyze the data, a more complete picture of the phenotypic changes associated with obesity and weight loss can be obtained.  An important tool used by the laboratory is metabolomic profiling, which is the measurement of small molecules (metabolites) in biological samples which comprise both a source of energy and building blocks of the body.  Because of the intimate relationship between nutrients and metabolites (which often are one in the same), metabolomics provides a unique and powerful tool to understand changes that occur following changes in diet, including weight loss.